Study

Response of a parasitoid fly, Gymnosoma rotundatum (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Tachinidae) to the aggregation pheromone of Plautia stali Scott (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and its parasitism of hosts under field conditions

  • Published source details Higaki M. & Adachi I. (2011) Response of a parasitoid fly, Gymnosoma rotundatum (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Tachinidae) to the aggregation pheromone of Plautia stali Scott (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and its parasitism of hosts under field conditions. Biological Control, 58, 215-221

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use chemicals to attract natural enemies

Action Link
Natural Pest Control
  1. Use chemicals to attract natural enemies

    A controlled, replicated study in 1999 in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan (Higaki & Adachi 2011) found greater parasitism of brown-winged green bugs Plautia stali in traps with an attractive chemical (6.0% individuals parasitized) than in control traps with light lures (2.7% parasitized). Parasitic flies Gymnosoma rotundatum were attracted to a chemical (methyl-2,4,6-decatrienoate) naturally produced by male brown-winged green bugs. In a separate experiment manipulating groups of bugs, the fly G. rotundatum parasitised 1-17% of bugs baited with the chemical compared to 0% for unbaited bugs. Monitoring from 2000 to 2005 found much fewer parasitic flies (approximately 25-95 adults captured at peak numbers) than brown-winged green bugs (260-9,710 adults) were attracted to traps with chemical lures. From April to November 1999, water-basin traps with 85 mg of methyl-2,4,6-decatrienoate were placed in Japanese paulownia Paulownia tomentosa trees and catches were compared with light traps (using 100 W mercury vapour lamps). In the second experiment (repeated six times) groups of 10 brown-winged green bugs were attached to frames with and without chemical lures and parasitism was monitored. Monitoring in 2000-2005 tested the lure in 2-5 water-basin traps/year from April to November.

Output references

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