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Individual study: Combining intercropping with semiochemical releases: optimization of alternative control of Sitobion avenae in wheat crops in China

Published source details

Wang G., Cui L., Dong J., Francis F., Liu Y. & Tooker J. (2011) Combining intercropping with semiochemical releases: optimization of alternative control of Sitobion avenae in wheat crops in China. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 140, 189-195


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use chemicals to attract natural enemies Natural Pest Control

A randomised, replicated, controlled study in 2008-2009 in Shandong, China (Wang et al. 2011) found greater parasitism of English grain aphid Sitobion avenae in wheat Triticum aestivum plots containing methyl salicylate lures (averaging 23-26% aphids parasitised) than in controls without lures (18-19%). Aphid parasitism by wasps (Aphidiidae) increased to 27-29% when the chemical was released in wheat-oilseed rape Brassica napus intercrops. More predatory lady beetles (Coccinellidae) occurred in wheat monocrop and intercrop plots with lures (13-16 and 16-20 lady beetles/100 shoots, respectively) than in the monocrop control without lures (9-11 lady beetles). Fewer English grain aphids were found in plots with lures (approximately 455-520 and 345-380 aphids/100 shoots, in monoculture and intercropped plots respectively) than in the control (870-920 aphids). Wheat yields were also higher in plots with methyl salicylate lures (5.7-6.1 and 6.4-6.7 t/ha in monoculture and intercropped plots, respectively) compared to the control (5.3-5.4 t/ha). The study compared four treatments replicated three times: wheat monocrop (control), monocrop with methyl salicylate, wheat-oilseed rape intercrop, and intercrop with methyl salicylate. Methyl salicylate was released from one slow-release dispenser/plot at 120 mg/m²/week. Plots were 10 x 10 m and insects were monitored on 10 shoots at 10 sample sites/plot.