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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of experimental forestry treatments on a Maine amphibian community

Published source details

Patrick D.A., Hunter M.L. & Calhoun A.J.K. (2006) Effects of experimental forestry treatments on a Maine amphibian community. Forest Ecology and Management, 234, 323-332


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Leave coarse woody debris in forests Amphibian Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 2004–2009 of mixed coniferous and deciduous forest wetlands in Maine, USA (Patrick, Hunter & Calhoun 2006) found that there was no significant difference in amphibian abundance in clearcuts with woody debris retained or removed for eight of nine amphibian species (see also Popescu et al. 2012). Abundance of spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum juveniles was significantly higher in clearcuts with woody debris retained than in those where it was removed (11 vs 7%). Although not significant, captures tended to be higher in clearcuts with woody debris retained for three of nine species and with woody debris removed for five species. Treatments extended 164 m (2 ha) from each of four created breeding ponds and were clear-cut in 2003–2004. Drift-fences with pitfall traps were installed around each pond at 1, 17, 50, 100 and 150 m from the edge. Wood frogs were marked. Monitoring was in April-September 2004–2005.

 

(Summarised by Rebecca K Smith)

Thin trees within forests Amphibian Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 2004–2005 of mixed coniferous and deciduous forest wetlands in Maine, USA (Patrick, Hunter & Calhoun 2006) found that amphibian abundance in partial (50%) harvest plots tended to be lower than unharvested and higher or similar to clearcuts (see also Popescu et al. 2012). The proportion of captures in partial harvest was lower than that in unharvested plots for adults and/or juveniles of eight of nine species including adult wood frogs Lithobates sylvaticus (partial: 27%; unharvested: 51%; clearcut: 11%) and juvenile spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum (partial: 20%; unharvested: 62%; clearcuts: 7–11%). Captures were higher in partial harvests than unharvested plots for adult northern leopard frogs Lithobates pipiens (partial: 47%; unharvested: 30%; clearcuts: 7–17%) and red-spotted newts (partial: 44%; unharvested: 25%). Captures in partial harvest were higher than clearcuts for adults of four of nine species, lower for two species and similar for three species. Juvenile captures were higher in partial harvests than clearcuts for seven of nine species. All treatments extended 164 m (2 ha) from each of four created breeding ponds and were cut in 2003–2004. There were two clearcut treatments with and without woody debris retained. Drift-fences with pitfall traps were installed around each pond at 1, 17, 50, 100 and 150 m from the edge. Monitoring was in April–September 2004–2005.