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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A three-year project for the management and the conservation of amphibians in Northern Italy

Published source details

Gentilli A., Scali S., Barbieri F. & Bernini F. (2002) A three-year project for the management and the conservation of amphibians in Northern Italy. Biota, 3, 27-33


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1998–2000 in the Lombardy District, Italy (Gentilli et al. 2002) found that translocated head-started Italian agile frog Rana latastei tadpoles metamorphosed successfully and survived over winter. Metamorphosis occurred in both years. Eggs were collected from sites close to the release sites. Eggs were hatched in semi-natural conditions in captivity. In 2000, a total of 12,000 tadpoles were raised in captivity. Tadpoles with developing hind limbs were released to new and restored ponds and habitat in five natural parks. Tadpoles were released at two sites in 2000 and seven sites in 2001.

 

Restore ponds Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1998–2000 of restored and created ponds in 12 natural parks in the Lombardy District, Italy (Gentilli et al. 2002) found that pond restoration and creation resulted in increases in some existing amphibian species populations and colonization by new species within two years. Existing populations increased at six sites (average: 1.5 species; range 1–4). Between one and seven species colonized ponds at each site (average: 1.7 species). Numbers of egg clumps increased in the second year. Ponds were created or were restored by methods such as deepening and were lined with clay or PVC if necessary. Other habitat management was also undertaken at some sites including increasing dead wood, excavating tributary canals and removing and excluding fish.

 

Translocate toads Amphibian Conservation

A study in 1998–2000 in the Lombardy District, Italy (Gentilli et al. 2002) found that translocated head-started common spadefoot toad Pelobates fuscus insubricus tadpoles metamorphosed successfully and survived over winter. Metamorphosis occurred in both years and some juveniles were found in spring 2001. Eggs were collected from sites close to the release sites. Eggs were hatched in semi-natural conditions in captivity. In 2000, two thousand tadpoles were raised in captivity. In 2000, tadpoles with developing hind limbs were released to six new and restored ponds and habitat in five natural parks.

 

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1998–2000 of Italian agile frog Rana latastei in the Lombardy District, Italy (Gentilli et al. 2002) found that tadpoles were raised successfully in captivity and metamorphosed once they were released. In 2000, 1,200 agile frog tadpoles were raised successfully. In 2001, the number raised was 28,000. Animals metamorphosed once released in both years. Eggs were collected and hatched in semi-natural conditions in captivity. Tadpoles with developing hind limbs were released back to their original ponds. In 2000, frogs were released back to two sites and in 2001 to six sites. Half of the tadpoles were translocated to new and restored ponds.

 

Create ponds for amphibians Amphibian Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1998–2000 of created and restored ponds in 12 natural parks in mountain and plains areas in the Lombardy District, Italy (Gentilli, Scali, Barbieri & Bernini 2002) found that pond creation and restoration increased amphibian populations and resulted in colonization by new species within two years. Populations increased at six sites (average: 1.5 species; range 1–4). Between one and seven species colonized ponds at each site (average: 1.7 species). Numbers of egg clumps increased in the second year. Ponds were created or restored and were lined with clay or PVC if necessary. Other habitat management was also undertaken at some sites including increasing dead wood, excavating tributary canals and removing fish.