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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Relocation of amphibians to created seasonal ponds in southwestern Ohio

Published source details

Weyrauch S.L. & Amon J.P. (2002) Relocation of amphibians to created seasonal ponds in southwestern Ohio. Ecological Restoration, 20, 31-36


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1995–2000 of two created ponds in Ohio, USA (Weyrauch & Amon 2002) found that translocated spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum, but not tiger salamanders Ambystoma tigrinum, reproduced in created ponds.  Four adult spotted salamanders and one egg mass were found in one pond in 1997 and three egg masses in the other pond in 2000.  Metamorphs were produced in both ponds in 1996–1998.  Tiger salamanders were not recorded following their introduction.  Ponds were created in 1995–1997 and were 2–4 m deep.  Vegetation, plankton and organic matter (from local wetlands) were added.  Spotted salamander eggs (600–1,100), larvae (40–850) and metamorphs (4–33) and tiger salamander metamorphs (0–25) were translocated in spring 1996–1998 and 2000.  Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing and pitfall traps surrounding ponds, dip-netting and egg counts.

 

Create ponds for salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A small, replicated, before-and-after study in 1995–2000 of two created ponds in agricultural land and a reserve in Ohio, USA (Weyrauch & Amon 2002) found that translocated spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum, but not tiger salamanders Ambystoma tigrinum reproduced in created ponds. Four adult spotted salamanders and one egg mass were found in one pond in 1997 and three egg masses in the other pond in 2000. Both ponds produced metamorphs in 1996–1998. Tiger salamanders were not recorded following translocation. Ponds were created in 1995–1997 and were 2–4 m deep. Water, vegetation, plankton and organic matter (from local wetlands) were added. Spotted salamander eggs (600–1100), larvae (40–850) and metamorphs (4–33) and tiger salamander metamorphs (0–25) were added in spring 1996–1998 and 2000. Amphibians were monitored using drift-fencing and pitfall traps around ponds and by dip-netting and egg counts.

 

Create ponds for frogs Amphibian Conservation

A small, replicated, before-and-after study in 1995–2000 of two created ponds in agricultural land and a reserve in Ohio, USA (Weyrauch & Amon 2002) found that translocated gray tree frogs Hyla versicolor did not reproduced in created ponds. Gray tree frogs were heard calling at one pond in 2000, but no evidence of breeding was found. Green frogs Rana clamitans, northern leopard frogs Rana pipiens and American toads Bufo americanus colonized both and bred in one pond. Ponds were created in 1995–1997 and were 2–4 m deep. Water, vegetation, plankton and organic matter (from local wetlands) were added. Larvae (0–35) and metamorphs (0–4) were added in spring 1996–1998 and 2000. Amphibians were monitored drift-fencing and pitfall traps around ponds and by dip-netting and egg counts.

 

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1995–2000 of two created ponds in Ohio, USA (Weyrauch & Amon 2002) found that translocated gray tree frogs Hyla versicolor did not reproduced in created ponds. Evidence of reproduction was not recorded, although frogs were heard calling at one pond in 2000. Ponds were created in 1995–1997 and were 2–4 m deep. Vegetation, plankton and organic matter (from local wetlands) were added. Gray tree frog larvae (0–35) and metamorphs (0–4) were translocated to the pond in spring 1996–1998 and 2000. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing and pitfall traps surrounding ponds, dip-netting and egg counts.