Study

Mammals were recorded in all and amphibians in 77% of 53 wildlife passages monitored in the Netherlands

  • Published source details Veenbaas G. & Brandjes J. (1999) Use of fauna passages along waterways under highways. Proceedings of the International Conference on Wildlife Ecology and Transportation, Florida Department of Transportation, Tallahassee, Florida USA, 253-258.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under roads

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under roads

    A replicated study in 1997–1998 of 53 wildlife passages along waterways under roads at over 20 sites in the Netherlands (Veenbaas & Brandjes 1999) found that all passages were used by mammals. At least 16 mammal species used passages. Waterside banks extending under bridges were used by 14 species and other types of passageways by 10 species. Brown rats Rattus norvegicus, mice and voles were the most frequently recorded mammals (see original publication for details). For all mammals, frequency of use increased with increasing passage diameter and width, but was not affected by substrate. Culverts and bridges were adapted for wildlife, in the 1990s. In 1997, thirty-one passages (0.4–3.5 m wide) were monitored. These included extended banks (unpaved or paved), planks along bridge or culvert walls, planks floating on the water, concrete passageways and plastic gutters covered with sand. In 1998, twenty-two passages were monitored for the effect of width and substrate. These were wooden passageways along bridge or culvert walls (0.2–0.6 m wide). Monitoring involved weekly checks of tracks on sandbeds (for 4–7 weeks) and ink pads (12 weeks in 1997, four weeks in 1998) across passageways.

  2. Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings

    A replicated study in 1997–1998 of 53 wildlife passages along waterways under roads at over 20 sites in the Netherlands (Veenbaas & Brandjes 1999) found that 77% of passages were used by amphibians. Amphibian tracks were recorded in 19–22 passages/year. There was no relationship between use and passage width or substrate. Culverts and bridges were adapted for wildlife in the 1990s in the Netherlands. In 1997, 31 passages (0.4–3.5 m wide) were monitored. These included extended banks (unpaved or paved), planks fixed on bridge or culvert walls, planks floating on the water, concrete passageways and plastic gutters covered with sand. In 1998, 22 passages were monitored for the effect of width and substrate. These were wooden passageways fixed on a bridge or culvert wall (0.2–0.6 m wide). Monitoring involved weekly checks of tracks on sandbeds (for 4–7 weeks) and ink pads (12 weeks in 1997, four weeks in 1998) across passageways.

     

Output references

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