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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Leiopelma hamiltoni homing

Published source details

Tocher M.D. & Brown D. (2004) Leiopelma hamiltoni homing. Herpetological Review, 35, 259-261


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A study in 1990–2000 on Stephens Island, New Zealand (Brown 1994, Tocher & Brown 2004) found that three of 12 translocated Hamilton's frog Leiopelma hamiltoni survived within the new habitat for at least eight years. Evidence of breeding had not been recorded by 1992. Only one juvenile was ever recorded, in 1996. Eight frogs survived the first year and were recaptured 61 times by 2000. Three were not recorded at the release site after 1994, but two were found back at their original habitat (76–89 m). After eight years, 42% of translocated frogs had been recaptured compared to 47% marked at the original site. Recaptured frogs showed variable weight changes between translocation and 1992 (+23%, −12 to +55%). In May 1992, frogs were translocated 40 m to a new rock-filled pit (72 m2) in a forest remnant. A predator-proof fence was built around the new habitat to exclude tuatara Sphenodon punctatus and the area was ‘seeded’ with invertebrate prey. Frogs were surveyed regularly from November 1990 to May 1992 (90 visits), intermittently in 1992–1996 and at least four times annually (over six days) in 1997–2000.

 

Create refuges Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1990–2000 of 12 endangered Hamilton's frog Leiopelma hamiltoni on Stephens Island, New Zealand (Brown 1994, Tocher & Brown 2004) found that three frogs survived in a created refuge within a predator-proof enclosure for at least eight years. There was no evidence of breeding by 1992 and only one juvenile was ever recorded, in 1996. Eight frogs survived the first year in the rock-filled pit and were recaptured 61 times by 2000. Two of three frogs that were not recorded at the release site after 1994, but were found back at their original habitat (76–89 m). After eight years, 42% of translocated frogs had been recaptured compared to 47% marked at the original site. In May 1992, frogs were translocated 40 m to a new rock-filled pit (72 m2) in a forest remnant. A predator-proof fence was built around the new habitat to exclude tuatara Sphenodon punctatus and the area was ‘seeded’ with invertebrate prey. Frogs were surveyed regularly from November 1990 to May 1992 (90 visits), intermittently in 1992–1996 and at least four times annually (over six days) in 1997–2000.