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Individual study: A review of wildlife use of 329 crossing structures in Australia, Europe and North America

Published source details

Taylor B.D. & Goldingay R.L. (2010) Roads and wildlife: impacts, mitigation and implications for wildlife management in Australia. Wildlife Research, 37, 320-331


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install overpasses over roads/railways Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of 30 papers monitoring 329 crossing structures in Australia, Europe and North America (Taylor & Goldingay 2010) found that overpasses were used by a range of mammals, particularly larger mammal species. Small mammals used conventional bridge overpasses (demonstrated by 2/4 relevant studies) and wildlife overpasses (4/7 studies). Arboreal mammals used wildlife overpasses (1/1 study). Medium-sized mammals used conventional bridge overpasses (4/5 studies) and wildlife overpasses (5/7 studies). Large mammals used conventional bridge overpasses (9/11 studies) and wildlife overpasses (23/23 studies). Studies suggested that ungulates used overpasses more when they were close to vegetation cover and a river or stream and less when they were in a cropland area. Narrow overpasses (<6 m wide) were not used by deer. Thirty papers, monitoring 329 crossing structures, were reviewed. Fourteen papers investigated multiple structure types, resulting in a total of 52 studies of different structure types. Overpasses included land bridges, wildlife overpasses with grass, trees or other vegetation, combined wildlife and vehicle overpasses, pole bridges and rope bridges.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of 30 studies reporting on monitoring of 329 crossing structures in Australia, Europe and North America (Taylor & Goldingay 2010) found that mammals used most culverts and underpasses. Small mammals used pipes (demonstrated by 6/7 relevant studies), drainage culverts (5/5 studies), adapted culverts (5/5 studies), wildlife underpasses (3/4 studies) and bridge underpasses (2/3 studies). Arboreal mammals used pipes (1/1 studies), drainage culverts (4/4 studies), adapted culverts (4/4 studies) and bridge underpasses (1/1 studies). Medium-sized mammals used pipes (8/11 studies), drainage culverts (12/13 studies), adapted culverts (8/8 studies), wildlife underpasses (6/8 studies) and bridge underpasses (6/7 studies). Large mammals used pipes (6/9 studies), drainage culverts (11/12 studies), adapted culverts (11/11 studies), wildlife underpasses (24/24 studies) and bridge underpasses (14/15 studies). Larger mammals tended to use more open underpasses. Small and medium-sized mammals used underpasses with funnel-fencing or adjoining walls and those with vegetation cover close to entrances. Those with vegetation cover tended to be avoided by some ungulates. Thirty papers reporting monitoring of 329 crossing structures were reviewed. Fourteen papers investigated multiple structure types, resulting in a total of 52 studies of different structure types. Underpasses, from small drainage pipes to dry passage bridges, comprised 82% of crossings.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings Amphibian Conservation

A review in 2010 of studies monitoring 327 road crossing structures in Australia, Europe and North America (Taylor & Goldingay 2010) found that amphibians used crossing structures in 12 of 14 studies. Amphibians used drainage culverts in four of five studies, adapted culverts in all three studies and pipes in both studies they were monitored. Wildlife underpasses, bridge underpasses and overpasses were used in the one study that monitored each. Amphibians did not use the one wildlife overpass monitored. Fourteen of the 30 published papers investigated multiple structure types, which resulted in a total of 52 studies of different structure types.

 

 

Install barrier fencing and underpasses along roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of 30 papers reporting on monitoring of 329 crossing structures in Australia, Europe and North America (Taylor & Goldingay 2010) found that mammals used most culverts and underpasses, among which some were in areas with roadside barrier fencing. Small mammals used pipes (demonstrated by 6/7 relevant studies), drainage culverts (5/5 studies), adapted culverts (5/5 studies), wildlife underpasses (3/4 studies) and bridge underpasses (2/3 studies). Arboreal mammals used pipes (1/1 studies), drainage culverts (4/4 studies), adapted culverts (4/4 studies) and bridge underpasses (1/1 studies). Medium-sized mammals used pipes (8/11 studies), drainage culverts (12/13 studies), adapted culverts (8/8 studies), wildlife underpasses (6/8 studies) and bridge underpasses (6/7 studies). Large mammals used pipes (6/9 studies), drainage culverts (11/12 studies), adapted culverts (11/11 studies), wildlife underpasses (24/24 studies) and bridge underpasses (14/15 studies). Larger mammals tended to use more open underpasses. Small and medium-sized mammals used underpasses with funnel-fencing or adjoining walls and those with vegetation cover close to entrances. Those with vegetation cover tended to be avoided by some ungulates. Thirty papers reporting monitoring of 329 crossing structures were reviewed. Fourteen papers investigated multiple structure types, resulting in a total of 52 studies of different structure types. Underpasses, from small drainage pipes to dry passage bridges, comprised 82% of crossings.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)