Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The impact of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis on a green and golden bell frog Litoria aurea reintroduction program at the Hunter Wetlands Centre Australia in the Hunter region of NSW

Published source details

Stockwell M.P., Clulow S., Clulow J. & Mahony M. (2008) The impact of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis on a green and golden bell frog Litoria aurea reintroduction program at the Hunter Wetlands Centre Australia in the Hunter region of NSW. Australian Zoologist, 34, 379-386


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred green and golden bell frogs Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2004–2006 of three created ponds in a restored wetland in New South Wales, Australia (Stockwell et al. 2008) found that captive-bred green and golden bell frogs Litoria aurea released as tadpoles did not result in the establishment of a stable population due to deaths from chytridiomycosis. Tadpole survival was high following release and some metamorphs survived for up to a year. However, numbers declined over the first 13 months and no frogs were recorded from March 2006. Four of six dead frogs found in 2005 and 53% of a sample of 60 juveniles captured tested positive for chytridiomycosis. In summer 2005, 850 tadpoles were released into three ponds created in 2002. A fence was installed surrounding the ponds and adjacent grassland (2,700 m2) to contain the frogs and in an attempt to exclude competing species, predators and the chytrid fungus. Visual encounter surveys were carried out 2–4 times each month. A sample of frogs were captured and tested for chytrid.

 

Create ponds for frogs Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2004–2006 of three created ponds in wetlands in New South Wales, Australia (Stockwell et al. 2008) found that captive-bred green and golden bell frog Litoria aurea released as tadpoles did not establish a stable population because of death from chytridiomycosis. Tadpole survival was high following release and some metamorphs survived for up to a year. However, numbers declined over the following 13 months and no frogs were recorded from March 2006. Four of six dead frogs found in 2005 and 53% of 60 juveniles captured tested positive for chytridiomycosis. In 2005, 850 tadpoles were released into three ponds created in 2002 within a restored wetland. A fence was installed surrounding the ponds and grassland (2,700 m2) to contain the frogs and to attempt to exclude competing species, predators and the chytrid fungus. Visual encounter surveys were carried out two to four times each month. A sample of frogs were captured and tested for chytrid fungus.