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Individual study: Influences of design and landscape placement parameters on amphibian abundance in constructed wetlands

Published source details

Shulse C.D. (2010) Influences of design and landscape placement parameters on amphibian abundance in constructed wetlands. Wetlands, 30, 915-928


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Create wetland Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2006 of 49 constructed wetlands throughout northern Missouri, USA (Shulse 2010) found that 16 of 22 local amphibian species were recorded in the wetlands. The average number of species per wetland was five (range: 0–10). Cricket frogs Acris cepitans, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus and leopard frog Lithobates blairi/sphenocephalus complex were each found in over 80% of wetlands. Green frogs Lithobates clamitans and gray tree frog Hyla versicolor/chrysoscelis complex were found in 53–55% of wetlands. Other frog and toad species were recorded in 29–37% and salamanders in 2–18% of wetlands. Species were positively associated with variables such as pond or stream density, grassland, wetland or vegetation cover. Fish were present at 43% of sites. Twenty wetlands were compensatory wetlands for road developments, and many others were farm ponds that were then managed by the agency for wildlife. Wetlands ranged from temporary ponds to large permanent ponds. Amphibians were sampled once or twice in March–August 2006 by visual and call surveys, dip-netting and funnel trapping.