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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Abandon not hope: status of repatriated populations of spotted salamanders and wood frogs at the Tyson Research Center, St.Louis County, Mo 1998

Published source details

Sexton O.J., Phillips C.A., Bergman T.J., Wattenberg E.W. & Preston R.E. (1998) Abandon not hope: status of repatriated populations of spotted salamanders and wood frogs at the Tyson Research Center, St.Louis County, Mo 1998. Pages 340-344 in: Status and Conservation of Midwestern Amphibians. Universiity of Iowa Press, Iowa City, Iowa.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate wood frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1974–1995 in Missouri, USA (Sexton et al. 1998) found that one of four wood frog Rana sylvatica egg translocations established a breeding population. The population was stable between 1987 (311 captured) and 1995 (364). Wood frogs also colonized four other created ponds (0.9–2.4 km). In 1980, 11 wood frog egg masses were translocated 50 km into four created ponds. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps around ponds and by egg mass counts and call surveys.

 

Create ponds for salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1974–1995 of seven created forest ponds in Missouri, USA (Sexton et al.1998) found that translocated spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum established breeding populations in five ponds. Numbers of salamander captures increased from 428 in 1974 to 2,301 in 1995 at the release pond. Salamanders also colonized four additional created ponds (0.9–2.4 km). In 1966, spotted salamander egg masses were translocated 1 km to a newly constructed pond. Another six ponds were constructed at the site in 1965–1979. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps around ponds and by egg mass counts.

 

Translocate salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1974–1995 in Missouri, USA (Sexton et al. 1998) found that translocated spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum eggs established a breeding population. Numbers of salamander captures increased from 428 in 1974 to 2,301 in 1995 at the release pond.  Salamanders also colonized four other created ponds (0.9–2.4 km).  In 1966, spotted salamander egg masses were translocated 1 km to a newly constructed pond.  Another six ponds were constructed at the site in 1965–1979.  Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps around ponds and by egg mass counts.

 

Create ponds for frogs Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1974–1995 of seven created forest ponds in Missouri, USA (Sexton et al.1998) found that one of four translocations of wood frogs Rana sylvatica established breeding populations in five ponds. The successful translocation resulted in a stable population between 1987 (311 captured) and 1995 (364). Wood frogs also colonized four additional created ponds (0.9–2.4 km). In 1980, 11 wood frog egg masses were translocated 50 km into four created ponds. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps around ponds and by egg mass counts and call surveys.