Study

Pilot project bracken: preliminary results from the resettlement of adult toads to a substitute breeding site

  • Published source details Schlupp M., Kietz R., Podloucky R. & Stolz F.M. (1989) Pilot project bracken: preliminary results from the resettlement of adult toads to a substitute breeding site. Amphibians and Roads: Proceedings of the Toad Tunnel Conference, Rendsburg, Federal Republic of Germany, 127-135.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Create ponds for toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Translocate toads

    A before and after study in 1986–1992 of a created pond in wet pasture near Ahlerstedt, Germany (Schlupp et al. 1989, Schlupp & Podloucky 1994) found that translocated common toads Bufo bufo bred in the new pond every year. Population size did not differ significantly before and after resettlement (522 vs 590). In 1987, 29% of migrating toads chose the created pond rather than their original pond (across a road). By 1988 the proportion was 75% and by 1992 it was 99%. Marked individuals indicated that 83% of the population used the new pond (91% of males; 67% of females). An amphibian fence with pitfall traps was installed along 400 m of road. Toads captured were placed in the created pond (53 x 20 m). A temporary mesh fence around the pond allowed toads to reach but not leave the pond in spring 1986–1990. All animals were tagged.

     

  2. Create ponds for toads

    A before-and-after study in 1986–1992 of a pond created to prevent amphibians migrating across a road between Hollenbeck and Ahlerstedt, Germany (Schlupp et al. 1989, Schlupp & Podloucky 1994) found that common toads Bufo bufo established a breeding population in the pond and the number migrating across the road decreased significantly. Breeding took place every year from 1986. In 1987, 29% of migrating toads chose the created pond. By 1988 the proportion was 75% and by 1992 it was 99%. Marked individuals indicated that 83% of the population used the new pond (91% of males; 67% of females). Population size did not differ significantly before and after resettlement (522 vs 590). Common frogs Rana temporaria migrated to and bred in the pond from 1986. The pond (53 x 20 m) was constructed on wet pasture in 1982. A temporary mesh fence around the pond allowed toads to reach but not leave the pond in spring 1986–1990. An amphibian fence was installed along 400 m of the road. Animals captured in pitfall traps along the fence were placed in the created pond. All animals were tagged.

     

Output references
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