Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effect of pasture management on establishment and seed dispersal of introduced yellow rattle Rhinanthus minor and ox-eye daisy Leucanthemum vulgare, Hill Farm, Little Wittenham, Oxfordshire, UK

Published source details

Coulson S.J., Bullock J.M., Stevenson M.J. & Pywell R.F. (2001) Colonization of grassland by sown species: dispersal versus microsite limitation in responses to management. Journal of Applied Ecology, 38, 204-216


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Add yellow rattle seed Rhinanthus minor to hay meadows Farmland Conservation

A randomized, replicated controlled trial in 1995-1997 in Oxfordshire, UK (Coulson et al. 2001) found that yellow rattle Rhinanthus minor could be effectively established on a pasture field by ‘slot seeding’. Different management treatments, cutting, grazing or both, did not affect survival or establishment. However yellow rattle seeds were spread a greater distance when hay was cut in July than without a hay cut. Seeds were sown in strips previously sprayed with herbicide by a tractor-mounted slot seeder, in October 1995. Four management treatments were replicated five times in 20 x 10 m plots. The treatments were cut once (July), cut twice (July and September), cut July and autumn grazed. Monitoring of plant dispersal was carried out using seed traps at the soil surface, from June to October 1997.

Restore/create species-rich, semi-natural grassland Farmland Conservation

A randomized, replicated controlled trial at Hill Farm, Little Wittenham, Oxfordshire, England (Coulson et al. 2001) found that both yellow rattle Rhinanthus minor and oxeye daisy Leucanthemum vulgare could be effectively established on a pasture field by ‘slot seeding’. Different management treatments, cutting, grazing or both, did not affect the survival or establishment of either species, but yellow rattle seeds were spread a greater distance when hay was cut in July than without a hay cut. Seeds were sown in strips previously sown with herbicide by a tractor-mounted slot seeder, in October 1995. Four management treatments were replicated five times in 20 x 10 m plots. The treatments were cut once (July), cut twice (July and September), cut July and autumn grazed. Monitoring of plant dispersal was carried out using seed traps at the soil surface, from June to October 1997.