Study

Dissolved oxygen requirements for hatching success of two Ambystomatid salamanders in restored ephemeral ponds

  • Published source details Sacerdote A.B. & King R.B. (2009) Dissolved oxygen requirements for hatching success of two Ambystomatid salamanders in restored ephemeral ponds. Wetlands, 29, 1202-1213

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Remove tree canopy to reduce pond shading

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Restore ponds

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Use prescribed fire or modifications to burning regime in forests

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Remove tree canopy to reduce pond shading

    A before-and-after study in 2005–2007 of a restored forest pond in Illinois, USA (Sacerdote & King 2009) found that hatching success of spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum did not increase following canopy removal. Two egg masses failed in 2005 and 2006 before canopy removal and two failed in 2007 after removal. Restoration started in 2000 and included destruction of drainage tiles, clearing of invasive plants and prescribed burning. Canopy thinning was undertaken in winter 2006–2007. An egg mass was placed in two mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in the pond. Eggs were monitored every five days until hatching was complete.

     

  2. Restore ponds

    A small, replicated study in 2005–2007 of five restored forest ponds in Illinois, USA (Sacerdote & King 2009) found that spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum hatching success increased following additional prescribed burning, but not canopy removal. Eggs failed to hatch in three restored ponds. However, hatching success of egg masses increased after a prescribed burn at the one pond (2005: 0%; 2006–2007: 30–54%). This was not the case following canopy thinning at another pond (0%). Restored ponds had similar hatching success to ponds with resident spotted salamanders in 2005–2006 (29 vs 30%), but significantly higher success in 2007 following additional restoration (62 vs 20%). Restoration started in 2000 and included destruction of drainage tiles, clearing of invasive plants and prescribed burning. An egg mass was placed in two mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in each restored pond. Three enclosures with an egg mass were also placed in each of three ponds with existing spotted salamanders populations (different site). Eggs were monitored every five days.

     

  3. Use prescribed fire or modifications to burning regime in forests

    A before-and-after study in 2005–2007 of a pond in restored mixed forest in Illinois, USA (Sacerdote & King 2009) found that prescribed burning resulted in increased hatching success for spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum. Eggs failed to hatch in 2005, but following burning, hatching success of egg masses was 29% in 2006 and 53% in 2007. Restoration started in 2000 and included destruction of drainage tiles, clearing of invasive plants, prescribed burning and removal of leaf litter. The burn was in autumn 2005. An egg mass was placed in two mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in the pond. Eggs were monitored every five days until hatching was complete.

     

Output references

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