Study

Reintroduction of extirpated flatwoods amphibians into restored forested wetlands in northern Illinois: feasibility assessment, implementation, habitat restoration and conservation implications

  • Published source details Sacerdote A.B. (2009) Reintroduction of extirpated flatwoods amphibians into restored forested wetlands in northern Illinois: feasibility assessment, implementation, habitat restoration and conservation implications. PhD thesis. Department of Biological Sciences. Northern Illinois University.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate wood frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate salamanders (including newts)

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Restore wetland

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Translocate wood frogs

    A replicated study in 2005–2008 in a restored forested wetland in Lake County, Illinois, USA (Sacerdote 2009) found that translocated wood frog Lithobates sylvaticus eggs hatched and survived as tadpoles in enclosures in restored ponds. Tadpole survival in restored ponds was 6–57%. In 2008, two translocated wood frog egg masses were placed in separate mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in each of five restored ponds. Tadpoles were monitored 2–3 times/week until metamorphosis. Tadpoles were moved if ponds dried.

     

  2. Translocate salamanders (including newts)

    A replicated study in 2005–2008 in a restored forested wetland in Lake County, Illinois, USA (Sacerdote 2009) found that translocated spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum eggs hatched and survived as tadpoles in enclosures in restored ponds.  Overall, tadpole survival rates (without effects of pond drying) were similar in restored and donor ponds (15–65 vs 26–81%).  Translocated egg masses were placed in two mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in each of five restored ponds and three enclosures in three donor ponds annually in 2005–2008.  Tadpoles were monitored two or three times/week until metamorphosis.  Tadpoles were moved if ponds dried.

     

  3. Restore wetland

    A before-and-after study in 2000–2006 of a restored forested wetland in Lake County, Illinois, USA (Sacerdote 2009) found that restoration did not increase amphibian species diversity or natural recolonization by three target species five years after restoration. There was no natural recolonization by spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum, wood frog Lithobates sylvaticus or spring peeper Pseudacris crucifer. Species richness was similar before (4–8) and after restoration (4–6); the diversity index tended to increase (0.5 vs 1.2). Post-restoration, the abundance of northern leopard frog Lithobates pipiens, American toad Anaxyrus americanus and western chorus frog Pseudacris triseriata increased. Green frogs Lithobates clamitans and bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeiana were detected in small numbers, but did not breed. Restoration was undertaken in 2000. Agricultural drainage tiles were removed to restore water levels to previous wetland levels. Non-native European buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica and garlic mustard Alliaria petiolaris were removed using herbicide, chainsaws, manually and controlled burns. Native trees were also planted. Amphibians were monitored in 2004–2006 using drift-fences with pitfall traps and funnel traps, dip-netting, artificial cover, visual and mark-recapture surveys.

     

  4. Translocate frogs

    A replicated study in 2005–2008 in a restored forested wetland in Lake County, Illinois, USA (Sacerdote 2009) found that translocated spring peeper Pseudacris crucifer tadpoles survived to metamorpohosis in enclosures in restored ponds. All tadpoles survived through metamorphosis. In 2008, 12 tadpoles were placed in two mesh enclosures (56 x 36 x 36 cm) in two restored ponds. Tadpoles were monitored 2–3 times/week until metamorphosis. Tadpoles were moved if ponds dried.

     

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 17

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust