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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Plan de reintroducción y seguimiento de la ranita meridional (Hyla meridionalis) en Mendizorrotz (Gipuzkoa, País Vasco) (1998-2003)

Published source details

Rubio X. & Etxezarreta J. (2003) Plan de reintroducción y seguimiento de la ranita meridional (Hyla meridionalis) en Mendizorrotz (Gipuzkoa, País Vasco) (1998-2003). Munibe, 16, 160-177


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred frogs Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1998–2003 in Gipuzkoa province, Spain (Rubio & Etxezarreta 2003) found that released captive-bred and captive-reared stripeless tree frog Hyla meridionalis juveniles and translocated adults established breeding populations in 11 of 14 created ponds. Metamorphosis, mating, eggs and well-developed larvae were observed in 11 of the ponds, froglets were also recorded in some ponds. Translocated adults survived in good numbers and returned to 12 of 14 ponds. Introduced predators, dense vegetation, eutrophication and drying resulted in reduced survival and reproduction in some ponds. A small number of additional ponds were colonized by the species. Thirteen ponds were created and one restored, with vegetation planted in 1999–2000. In 2000–2003, a total of 5,767 tadpoles were bred in captivity and released (171–3,989/year). Eggs were also collected, reared in captivity (in outdoor ponds) and then released as 871 metamorphs and 19,478 tadpoles into eight of the ponds. In 1998–2003, a total of 1,405 adults were translocated to the ponds.

 

Create ponds for frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1998–2003 of 13 created and one restored pond in Gipuzkoa province, Spain (Rubio & Etxezarreta 2003) found that translocated adult and released head-started and captive-bred juvenile stripeless tree frogs Hyla meridionalis established breeding populations in 11 ponds. Translocated adults survived in good numbers and returned to 12 ponds. Mating, eggs and well-developed larvae were observed in 11 ponds and froglets were recorded in some ponds. However, introduced predators, dense vegetation, eutrophication and drying resulted in reduced survival and reproduction in some ponds. In 1999–2000, 13 ponds were created, one restored and vegetation was planted. In 1998–2003, a total of 1,405 adults were translocated to the ponds. Eggs were collected and reared in captivity (outdoor ponds) and released as 871 metamorphs and 19,478 tadpoles into eight ponds. An additional 5,767 captive-bred tadpoles were released.

 

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1998–2003 of 14 ponds in Gipuzkoa province, Spain (Rubio & Etxezarreta 2003) found that translocated adults, along with head-started and captive-bred juvenile stripeless tree frogs Hyla meridionalis established breeding populations in 11 ponds. Translocated adults survived in good numbers and returned to 12 of 14 ponds. Mating, eggs and well-developed larvae were observed in 11 of the ponds; froglets were also recorded in some ponds. Introduced predators, dense vegetation, eutrophication and drying resulted in reduced survival and reproduction in some ponds. A small number of additional ponds were colonized by the species. Thirteen ponds were created and one restored, with vegetation planted in 1999–2000. In 1998–2003, a total of 1,405 adults were translocated to the ponds. Eggs were also collected, reared in captivity (in outdoor ponds) and released as 871 metamorphs and 19,478 tadpoles into eight of the ponds. An additional 5,767 captive-bred tadpoles were released.

 

Captive breeding frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 2000–2003 in Gipuzkoa province, Spain (Rubio & Etxezarreta 2003) found that stripeless treefrogs Hyla meridionalis reproduced successfully in captivity. In 2000–2003, a total of 5,767 tadpoles were bred in captivity and released (171–3,989/year).

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1998–2003 of stripeless tree frogs Hyla meridionalis in Gipuzkoa province, Spain (Rubio & Etxezarreta 2003) found that released, captive-reared juveniles, with captive-bred juveniles and translocated adults, established breeding populations in 11 of 14 created ponds. Metamorphs, breeding behaviour, eggs and well-developed larvae were observed in 11 of the ponds. Froglets were also recorded in some ponds. Translocated adults survived in good numbers and returned to 12 of 14 ponds. Introduced predators, dense vegetation, eutrophication and drying resulted in reduced survival and reproduction in some ponds. A small number of additional ponds were colonized by the species. Thirteen ponds were created and one restored with vegetation planted in 1999–2000. Eggs were collected and reared in captivity in outdoor pools. A total of 871 metamorphs and 19,478 tadpoles were released into eight of the ponds. An additional 5,767 tadpoles were bred in captivity and released and 1,405 adults translocated to the ponds.