Study

A test of two annual cover crops for controlling Phalaris arundinacea invasion in restored sedge meadow wetlands

  • Published source details Perry L.G. & Galatowitsch S.M. (2003) A test of two annual cover crops for controlling Phalaris arundinacea invasion in restored sedge meadow wetlands. Restoration Ecology, 11, 297-307.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Introduce nurse plants to aid focal non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Introduce seeds of non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Introduce nurse plants to aid focal non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, randomized, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 1997–1999 in a wet basin in Minnesota, USA (Perry & Galatowitsch 2003) found that sowing two potential nurse plant species typically had no significant effect on above-ground biomass of sown porcupine sedge Carex hystericina, after 1–2 growing seasons. Amongst plots experimentally invaded with reed canarygrass Phalaris arundinacea, plots with and without nurse plants contained a statistically similar sedge biomass in 48 of 48 comparisons (with: 0–100 g/m2; without: 0–1 g/m2). Amongst plots that were not experimentally invaded, plots with and without nurse plants contained a statistically similar sedge biomass in 14 of 16 comparisons (with: 0–1,130 g/m2; without: 0–1,790 g/m2). In the other two comparisons, plots with nurse plants contained a lower sedge biomass (0 g/m2) than plots without (2–700 g/m2). Methods: In June 1997 and April 1998, four hundred and eighty 0.25-m2 plots were established (in five sets) in an experimental, vegetation-free wet basin. Porcupine sedge seeds were sown onto all 480 plots (500–5,000 seeds/m2). Seeds of one nurse plant species (either barnyardgrass Echinochloa crusgalli or nodding smartweed Polygonum lapathifolium) were sown onto 384 plots (125–5,000 seeds/m2). Reed canarygrass seeds were sown onto 336 plots (125–5,000 seeds/m2). Treatments were randomly allocated within sets of plots. Biomass was sampled from the centre of the plots – half after one growing season, half after two – then dried and weighed. This study used the same site as (2), but a different experimental set-up.

  2. Introduce seeds of non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1998–1999 in an experimental wet basin in Minnesota, USA (Perry & Galatowitsch 2003) reported that plots sown with porcupine sedge Carex hystericina seeds supported porcupine sedge populations after 1–2 growing seasons. In plots only sown with porcupine sedge, above-ground biomass was <1–16 g/m2 after one growing season, then 0–1,790 g/m2 after two. In plots sown with other species alongside porcupine sedge (potential nurse plants and/or an invasive grass), sedge biomass was 0–3 g/m2 after one growing season, then 0–1,130 g/m2 after two. Variation was related to elevation (less biomass in higher, drier plots) and which companion species were planted. Methods: In June 1997 and April 1998, porcupine sedge seeds were sown onto four hundred and eighty 0.25-m2 plots in an experimental wet basin (500–5,000 seeds/m2). Plots were 2–37 cm above the water level. Sedge seeds were dipped in bleach, then stored cold (4°C) and wet for eight weeks before sowing. For experimental reasons, 432 plots were also sown with also one or two other plant species. Biomass was sampled from the centre of the plots – half after one growing season, half after two – then dried and weighed. This study used the same site as (2) and (7), but a different experimental set-up.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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