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Individual study: Four of five amphibian and one of two reptile translocations resulted in established breeding populations in the USA

Published source details

Reinert H.K. (1991) Translocation as a conservation strategy for amphibians and reptiles: some comments, concerns, and observations. Herpetologica, 47, 357-363


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A review in 1991 of amphibian translocation programmes (Reinert 1991) found that three salamander translocations resulted in established breeding populations.  In one study, breeding populations of two salamander species were established (Sexton & Phillips 1986).  In a second study, a breeding population of tiger salamanders Ambystoma tigrinum established at a created pond, with returning adults and 18–25 egg masses recorded within four years.  In 1982–1985, 1,000 tiger salamander eggs were translocated (20 km) annually to the pond (0.2 ha) in New Jersey, USA.

 

Create ponds for amphibians Amphibian Conservation

A review in 1991 of amphibian translocation programmes in the USA (Reinert 1991) found that four of five amphibian translocations to created ponds resulted in established breeding populations. In one study in Missouri, breeding populations of spotted salamanders Ambystoma maculatum and wood frogs Rana sylvatica established from translocated eggs in one created pond and ringed salamanders Ambystoma annulatum but not wood frogs established in a second created pond. In a study in New Jersey, a breeding population of tiger salamanders Ambystoma tigrinum established at a created pond, with returning adults and 18–25 egg masses recorded within four years. In Missouri, eggs of spotted salamanders, wood frogs and ringed salamander were translocated to two created ponds in 1965–1980. Both ponds were monitored until 1986. In New Jersey, 1,000 tiger salamander eggs were translocated 20 km to a created pond (0.2 ha) each year in 1982–1985.