Study

Boreal Baltic coastal meadow management for Bufo calamita

  • Published source details Rannap R. (2004) Boreal Baltic coastal meadow management for Bufo calamita. Pages 26-33 in: Coastal meadow management - best practice guidelines. Ministry of the Environment of the Republic of Estonia, Tallinn.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Engage landowners and other volunteers to manage land for amphibians

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate natterjack toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Clear vegetation

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Manage grazing regime

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Restore ponds

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Engage landowners and other volunteers to manage land for amphibians

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2001–2004 of three coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that habitat restoration with participation from 200 volunteers resulted in increased numbers of natterjack toads Bufo calamita on one island and a halt in the decline of the species on the other two islands. In 2001–2004, habitats were restored with the help of 200 volunteers during 14 work camps. Restoration included reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and implementation of grazing where it had ceased. Sixty-six breeding ponds and natural depressions were cleaned, deepened and restored. The project also involved educational and informational activities.

     

  2. Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2001–2004 of 16 coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that raising awareness, along with habitat restoration and translocation, increased numbers of natterjack toads Bufo calamita. Toad numbers increased on one island, declines were halted on two islands and one of 13 translocated populations was recorded breeding. Information on the natterjack population and conservation management was published, information boards put up and a documentary film on coastal meadows produced. In 2001–2004, habitats were restored on three coastal meadows where the species still occurred and on 13 where natterjacks could be reintroduced. Two hundred volunteers helped during 14 work camps. Restoration included reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and implementation of grazing. Sixty-six breeding ponds and natural depressions were cleaned, deepened and restored. Approximately 30,000 tadpoles from isolated quarry populations were translocated to the 13 restored meadows.

  3. Translocate natterjack toads

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2000–2004 of 13 coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that translocated natterjack toad Bufo calamita tadpoles bred at at least one site within three years. Following translocation of tadpoles in 2000, the first calling males were heard and spawning was recorded in the spring of 2003 in Saastna. In 2001–2004, terrestrial and aquatic habitats were restored on 13 coastal meadows where natterjacks had disappeared but could be reintroduced. Approximately 30,000 tadpoles from isolated quarry populations were translocated to the restored meadows.

     

  4. Clear vegetation

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2001–2004 of three coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that vegetation clearance, along with other terrestrial and aquatic habitat restoration increased numbers of natterjack toads Bufo calamita on one island and halted the decline on the other two islands. In 2001–2004, habitats were restored on three coastal meadows where the species still occurred. Restoration included reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and implementation of grazing where it had ceased. Sixty-six breeding ponds and natural depressions were cleaned, deepened and restored.

     

  5. Manage grazing regime

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2001–2004 of three coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that reintroduction of grazing along with aquatic and terrestrial habitat restoration increased the population of natterjack toads Bufo calamita on one island and halted the decline on the other two islands. In 2001–2004, habitats were restored where the species still occurred. Restoration included reintroduction of grazing where it had ceased, reed and scrub removal and mowing. Sixty-six breeding ponds and natural depressions were cleaned, deepened and restored.

     

     

     

  6. Restore ponds

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2001–2004 of three coastal meadows in Estonia (Rannap 2004) found that restoration of breeding ponds, along with terrestrial habitat management, increased numbers of natterjack toads Bufo calamita on one island and stopped a decline on the other two islands. In 2001–2004, habitats were restored on three coastal meadows where the species still occurred. Sixty-six breeding ponds and natural depressions were cleaned, deepened and restored. Restoration also included reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and implementation of grazing where it had ceased.

     

Output references
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