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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Designing wetlands for amphibians: the importance of predatory fish and shallow littoral zones in structuring of amphibian communities

Published source details

Porej D. & Hetherington T.E. (2005) Designing wetlands for amphibians: the importance of predatory fish and shallow littoral zones in structuring of amphibian communities. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 13, 445-455


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Create wetland Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2000–2001 of 42 wetlands constructed to replace lost wetlands in the Tillplain ecoregion, Ohio, USA (Porej & Hetherington 2005) found that created wetlands supported 13 species of amphibians and had an average species richness of four per site (range 1–7). Occurrence of species varied from 2–76%. Species richness was positively associated with presence of a shallow shoreline (on average two species more than wetlands without) and negatively associated with predatory fish (average one species less). Wetland age, size, emergent vegetation cover and surrounding forest cover did not affect species richness. Wetlands tended to be in areas with little or no forest cover and so amphibian species associated with forested wetlands were rare or absent. Amphibians were sampled three times in March–July 2001–2002 using aquatic funnel traps, dip-netting and visual surveys. Four call surveys were undertaken at the end of each month from March–June.