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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Clinical diagnosis and treatment of epidermal chytridiomycosis in African clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis)

Published source details

Parker J.M., Mikaelian I., Hahn N. & Diggs H.E. (2002) Clinical diagnosis and treatment of epidermal chytridiomycosis in African clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis). Comparative Medicine, 52, 265-268


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use antifungal treatment to reduce chytridiomycosis infection Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study of captive amphibians at the University of California, Berkeley, USA (Parker et al. 2002) found that western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis treated with formalin-malachite green solution were cured of chytridiomycosis. Five frogs died within the first 48 hours of treatment. However, following the last treatment, all 10 surviving frogs gradually improved in health. The four examined at three weeks, one and two months showed no signs of infection and the remaining six frogs had regained normal body weight within four months. Fifteen naturally infected frogs were treated four times with formalin-malachite green solution (25 parts per million formalin and 0.10 mg/L malachite green) at a dilution of 0.007 ml/L of tank water for 24 hours every second day. Following treatment, four were selected at random and killed humanely at either three weeks, one month or two months for examination for infection.