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Individual study: Itraconazole and miconazole, but not trimethoprimsulfadiazine cured frogs of chytrid infection.

Published source details

Nichols D.K. & Lamirande E.W. (2001) Successful treatment of chytridiomycosis. Froglog, 46, 1


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use antibacterial treatment to reduce chytridiomycosis infection Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in a laboratory (Nichols & Lamirande 2001) found that treatment of blue-and-yellow poison dart frogs Dendrobates tinctorius with trimethoprim-sulfadiazine survived longer but were not cured of the chytrid infection. Frogs treated with trimethoprim-sulfadiazine survived longer than untreated frogs. Juveniles were experimentally infected with the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Once excessive skin shedding had started, frogs were treated with trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (0.1% solution). Frogs were immersed in the treatment for five minutes each day for 11 consecutive days. Controls were untreated. Frogs were then killed humanely and examined.

 

Use antifungal treatment to reduce chytridiomycosis infection Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in a laboratory (Nichols & Lamirande 2001) found that experimentally infected blue-and-yellow poison dart frogs Dendrobates tinctorius treated with miconazole or itraconazole were cured of chytridiomycosis. However, frogs were intolerant to miconazole (possibly due to ethyl alcohol in the solution). Juveniles were experimentally infected with the chytrid fungus. Once excessive skin shedding had started, frogs were treated with miconazole (0.01% solution) or itraconazole (0.1% suspension). Frogs were bathed in the treatments daily for five minutes for eight or 11 days respectively. Controls were untreated. Frogs were then killed humanely and examined.