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Individual study: Evidence of amphibian occupation of artificial hibernacula

Published source details

Neave D.W. & Moffat C. (2007) Evidence of amphibian occupation of artificial hibernacula. Herpetological Bulletin, 99, 20-22


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create artificial hibernacula or aestivation sites Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 2004–2005 of three created hibernacula in parkland in Lancashire, UK (Neave & Moffat 2007) found that they were used by common frogs Rana temporaria and smooth newts Triturus vulgaris. Thirty-one frogs and nine smooth newts were captured leaving the hibernacula. Although great crested newt Triturus cristatus were recorded breeding in the adjacent pond, none were found to use the three hibernacula. Six hibernacula were created around a pond in 2002. Drift-fencing with four pitfalls were installed around three of the hibernacula in December 2004. Traps were checked in January–March 2005.

 

Translocate salamanders (including newts) Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2004 of a pond in parkland in Lancashire, UK (Neave & Moffat 2007) found that translocated smooth newts Triturus vulgaris established a breeding population.  Newts were translocated to the pond from a nearby building site in 2002 and monitored in spring 2004.

 

Translocate great crested newts Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2004 of a pond in parkland in Lancashire, UK (Neave & Moffat 2007) found that translocated great crested newts Triturus cristatus established a breeding population. Newts were translocated to the pond from a nearby building site in 2002 and monitored in spring 2004.

 

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2004 of a pond in parkland in Lancashire, UK (Neave & Moffat 2007) found that translocated common frogs Rana temporaria established a breeding population. Frogs were translocated to the pond from a nearby building site in 2002 and monitored in spring 2004.