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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Amphibians in pine stands managed with growing-season and dormant-season prescribed fire

Published source details

Miller K.V., Chapman B.R. & Ellington K.K. (2001) Amphibians in pine stands managed with growing-season and dormant-season prescribed fire. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 117, 75-78


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Use prescribed fire or modifications to burning regime in forests Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 1994–1996 of mature pine forest in Georgia, USA (Miller et al. 2001) found that there was no apparent difference between amphibian abundance or numbers of species in forest burned in the growing or dormant season. Total amphibian captures and numbers of species were similar between plots burned in the growing season (abundance: 32; species: 7) and dormant season (abundance: 19; species: 4). Captures were higher in unburned hardwood forest (abundance: 101; species: 14). Sample sizes were considered too small for statistical analysis. Three plots burned in the 1994 growing season (April–August; 3-year cycle) and three burned in the dormant season (January–March) were selected. Three adjacent hardwood plots were also surveyed. Three drift-fences with 12 pitfall traps and four artificial cover boards were installed within each plot. Monitoring was undertaken over four weeks, four times in 1995–1996.