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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The colonisation by great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) of a water body following treatment with a piscicide to remove a large population of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

Published source details

McLee A.G. & Scaife R.W. (1992) The colonisation by great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) of a water body following treatment with a piscicide to remove a large population of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Herpetological Society Bulletin, 42, 6-9


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove or control fish using rotenone Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1992 of an artificial pond in woodland in England, UK (McLee & Scaife 1992/1993) found that great crested newts Triturus cristatus and smooth newts Triturus vulgaris colonized following the removal of sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus using rotenone. Larvae of both species were observed in the pond two months after treatment. Released toad tadpoles survived and metamorphosed in the pond. The concrete tank had sloping walls and a water depth of 90 cm. It contained approximately 2,000–3,000 sticklebacks. Rotenone was applied (5%; 0.2 mg/L) in May 1992 and seven days later the pond was dredged to remove dead fish. Over 100 toad tadpoles were then released into the pond. Aquatic plants were also introduced.