Study

Amphibians: review of zoo breeding programmes

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Captive breeding frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Captive breeding salamanders (including newts)

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Captive breeding toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Amphibians: Use hormone treatment to induce sperm and egg release

Action Link
Management of Captive Animals

Use hormone treatment to induce sperm and egg release during captive breeding

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Captive breeding frogs

    A review of captive breeding programmes (Maruska 1986) found that a number of amphibian species have been bred successfully in captivity. Frog species that bred successfully were: red-eyed tree frog Agalychnis callidryas, Asiatic treefrog Rhacophorus leucomystax, Malaysian leaf frog Megophrys nasuta, Bell’s horned frog Ceratophrys ornate and a number of poison dart frog species (Dendrobatidae). Breeding was induced with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in White’s tree frog Litoria caerulea (with reduced temperatures) and African red frog Phrynomerus bifasciatus (with simulated wet and dry season).

     

  2. Captive breeding salamanders (including newts)

    A review of captive breeding programmes (Maruska 1986) found that a number of amphibian species have been bred successfully in captivity. Salamander species that were bred successfully in captivity were: Texas blind salamander Typhlomolge rathbuni, Tennessee cave salamander Gyrinophilus palleucus, Japanese giant salamander Andrais japonicas and Anderson's salamander Ambystoma andersoni. Slimy salamander Plethodon glutinosus produced eggs but they did not hatch.

     

  3. Captive breeding toads

    A review of captive breeding programmes (Maruska 1986) found that a number of amphibian species have been bred successfully in captivity. Toad species that were bred successfully were: Surinam toad Pipa pipa, Colombian giant toad Bufo blombergi, Houston toad Bufo houstonensis and Puerto Rican crested toad Peltophryne lemur.

     

     

  4. Amphibians: Use hormone treatment to induce sperm and egg release

  5. Use hormone treatment to induce sperm and egg release during captive breeding

    A review of captive breeding programmes (Maruska 1986) found that breeding was induced with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in White’s tree frog Litoria caerulea and African red frog Phrynomerus bifasciatus.

     

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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