Study

Re-introduction program for the common midwife toad and Iberian frog in the Natural Park of Peñalara in Madrid, Spain: can we defeat chytridiomycosis and trout introductions?

  • Published source details Martín-Beyer B., Fernández-Beaskoetxea S., Garcia G. & Bosch J. (2011) Re-introduction program for the common midwife toad and Iberian frog in the Natural Park of Peñalara in Madrid, Spain: can we defeat chytridiomycosis and trout introductions? Pages 81-84 in: Global Re-introduction Perspectives: 2011. More case studies from around the globe. IUCN/SSC Re-introduction Specialist Group & Abu Dhabi Environment Agency, Gland, Switzerland.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Captive breeding toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Head-start amphibians for release

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Captive breeding toads

    A replicated study in 2006–2011 of captive common midwife toads Alytes obstetricans near Madrid, Spain (Martín-Beyer et al. 2011) found that toads bred successfully. Housing adults outdoors, under semi-captive conditions, was most effective for achieving mating. Over 180 tadpoles were produced in captivity. Tadpoles were collected in the wild and treated against the chyrtid fungus using elevated temperature (> 21°C) and baths in antifungal drugs (itraconazole). Tadpoles were reared in indoor aquariums in similar environmental conditions to the wild.

     

  2. Head-start amphibians for release

    A replicated study in 2006–2011 of common midwife toads Alytes obstetricans and Iberian frogs Rana iberica in a National Park near Madrid, Spain (Martín-Beyer et al. 2011) found that released head-started midwife toads bred successfully and Iberian frog metamorphs survived their first winter. Fifteen radio-tagged adult midwife toads, two males carrying eggs, one pregnant female and a number of tadpoles were recorded. Mortality of metamorphs during the winter was high. A number of Iberian frogs released the previous year and earlier in the year were located. From 2006, all toad tadpoles found in 250 ponds were collected. Larvae were treated against the chytrid fungus using elevated temperatures (> 21°C) and baths in antifungal drugs (itraconazole). Tadpoles were reared in indoor aquariums, in similar environmental conditions to in the wild. Juveniles and adults were released where they were captured. Frog egg masses and tadpoles were also collected from a stream and head-started in aquariums. Tadpoles, juveniles and adults were released in several streams where fish had been removed by electro-fishing. Animals were monitored twice a week during the summer.

     

Output references
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