Study

Involving local communities in amphibian conservation: Taipei frog Rana taipehensis as an example

  • Published source details Lin H.-C., Cheng L.-Y., Chen P.-C. & Chang M.-H. (2008) Involving local communities in amphibian conservation: Taipei frog Rana taipehensis as an example. International Zoo Yearbook, 42, 90-98

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Reduce pesticide, herbicide or fertilizer use

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Engage landowners and other volunteers to manage land for amphibians

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Provide education programmes about amphibians

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Pay farmers to cover the costs of conservation measures

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Reduce pesticide, herbicide or fertilizer use

    A study in 1999–2006 of a water lily paddy field in Taipei County, Taiwan (Lin et al. 2008) found that stopping using pesticides along with habitat-improvement work doubled a population of Taipei frogs Rana taipehensis. In 2002, a farmer stopped using herbicides and pesticides on his field, which was at the centre of the frogs’ breeding habitat. By August 2003, the Taipei frog population in the field had more than doubled (from 28 to 85) and the farmer fully adopted organic-farming practices. Pollution from river construction work resulted in a drastic decline in the population in 2004–2005 (20 to 4), but by 2006 the population appeared to be recovering (19). Habitat-improvement work included cutting weeds in the field.

     

  2. Engage landowners and other volunteers to manage land for amphibians

    A before-and-after study in 1999–2006 of a water lily paddy field in Taipei County, Taiwan (Lin et al. 2008) found that participation from the local community resulted in a doubling of a population of Taipei frogs Rana taipehensis. Habitat management by the community, along with the halting of herbicide and pesticide use by providing financial incentives to a farmer, resulted in a significant population increase (from 28 to 85). Habitat-improvement work including cutting weeds in the field was undertaken with participation from a local school and the Tse-Xing Organic Agriculture Foundation. Community-education programmes about wetland conservation were also carried out in the area.

     

  3. Provide education programmes about amphibians

    A study in 1999–2006 of paddy fields in Taipei County, Taiwan (Lin et al. 2008) found that educating and raising awareness in a local community, along with other interventions, doubled a population of Taipei frogs Rana taipehensis. In 2002, over 80 locals, largely teachers and social workers attended a five day wetland conservation course. A further five courses were held in 2003–2007 with over 6,000 students attending. Three participants from the first course said they would provide farmland for wetland restoration and Taipei frog relocation. By August 2003, the Taipei frog population in the field had more than doubled (from 28 to 85) and the farmer adopted organic-farming practices. Pollution from river construction work resulted in a drastic decline in the population in 2004–2005 (20 to 4), but by 2006 the population appeared to be recovering (19). With the help of the local community, by selling a proportion of a farmer’s crop and paying for any additional expenses, he was persuaded to stop using herbicides and pesticides on his field, which formed the centre of the breeding habitat. Habitat-improvement work was also undertaken with participation from a local school and agricultural foundation.

     

  4. Pay farmers to cover the costs of conservation measures

    A before-and-after study in 1999–2006 of a water lily paddy field in Taipei County, Taiwan (Lin et al. 2008) found that providing financial incentives resulted in a farmer adopting organic-farming practices. Halting herbicide and pesticide use along with habitat management more than doubled a population of Taipei frogs Rana taipehensis (from 28 to 85). In 2002, a proportion of a farmer’s crop was sold for him and additional expenses resulting from no longer using herbicides and pesticides were paid for. Habitat management, with participation from the local community, included cutting weeds in the field. Community-education programmes about wetland conservation were also carried out in the area.

     

Output references

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