Study

Coastal meadow management on Kumari Islet, Matsalu Nature Reserve

  • Published source details Lepik I. (2004) Coastal meadow management on Kumari Islet, Matsalu Nature Reserve. Pages 86-89 in: Coastal meadow management - best practice guidelines. Ministry of the Environment of the Republic of Estonia, Tallinn.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Clear vegetation

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Manage grazing regime

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Restore ponds

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Clear vegetation

    A before-and-after study in 1994–2004 of a coastal meadow on an islet in Estonia (Lepik 2004) found that vegetation clearance, along with other terrestrial and aquatic habitat restoration, resulted in a stable population of natterjack toads Bufo calamita. A total of 17 natterjacks were counted in 1992 and seven in 2004, with numbers in the range 1–17/year. It is considered by the author that without management the natterjack population might have declined further or become extinct. Common toad Bufo bufo counts were eight in 1992 and four in 2004 and ranged from 3–40/year. Restoration involved reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and implementation of sheep grazing. Toads were counted along a 1 km transect.

     

  2. Manage grazing regime

    A before-and-after study in 1994–2004 of a coastal meadow on a small island in Estonia (Lepik 2004) found that reintroduction of grazing along with aquatic and terrestrial habitat restoration resulted in a stable population of natterjack toads Bufo calamita. A total of 17 natterjacks were counted in 1992 and seven in 2004, with numbers ranging from 1–17/year. The author considered that without management the population may have declined or become extinct. Common toad Bufo bufo counts were eight in 1992 and four in 2004 and ranged from 3 to 40/year. Restoration on the 16 ha island involved implementation of sheep grazing, reed and scrub removal and mowing. Toads were counted along a 1 km transect.

     

  3. Restore ponds

    A before-and-after study in 1992–2004 of a coastal meadow on an islet in Estonia (Lepik 2004) found that pond and terrestrial habitat restoration maintained a population of natterjack toads Bufo calamita. A total of 17 natterjacks were counted in 1992 and seven in 2004, with numbers ranging from 1–17/year. It is considered by the author that without management the natterjack population may have declined or become extinct. Common toad Bufo bufo counts were eight in 1992 and four in 2004 and ranged from 3–40/year. Restoration involved reed and scrub removal, mowing (cuttings removed) and reintroduction of sheep grazing. Toads were counted along a 1 km transect.

     

Output references

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