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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Composition, diversity, and spatial relationships of anurans following wetland restoration in a managed tropical forest

Published source details

Lee Y.F., Kuo Y.M., Lin Y.H., Chu W.C., Wang H.H. & Wu S.H. (2006) Composition, diversity, and spatial relationships of anurans following wetland restoration in a managed tropical forest. Zoological Science, 23, 883-891


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Restore wetland Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2002–2003 of a restored wetland in a tropical forest in Kenting, Taiwan (Lee et al. 2006) found that eight of 18 amphibian species known to be in the area colonized the wetland within a year. A total of 1,456 amphibians were recorded (average density: 0.025 m2). Cricket frog Fejervarya limnocharis was the most common species (62%), followed by ornate narrow-mouthed frog Microhyla ornate and spot-legged treefrog Polypedates megacephalus. These three species accounted for 97% of the relative frequency and abundance. Abundance varied with habitat type and within ponds was positively correlated with vegetation cover. From December 2002 to April 2003, a concrete pond was demolished, the hole filled with soil and replanted to restore a 0.5 ha semi-natural permanent wetland. Amphibians were monitored by visual survey within six habitat areas. Surveys were undertaken twice a month from May 2003 to April 2004.