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Individual study: Captive breeding and the fitness of reintroduced species: a test of the responses to predators in a threatened amphibian

Published source details

Kraaijeveld-Smit F.J.L., Griffiths R.A., Moore R.D. & Beebee T.J.C. (2006) Captive breeding and the fitness of reintroduced species: a test of the responses to predators in a threatened amphibian. Journal of Applied Ecology, 43, 360-365


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Captive breeding Mallorcan midwife toads Amphibian Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study of captive Mallorcan midwife toads Alytes muletensis in the UK (Kraaijeveld-Smit et al. 2006) found that there was a significant reduction in one predator defence trait (lower tail fin depth) in animals maintained in captivity for 9–12 compared to 1–2 generations. Long-term stock tadpoles also developed more slowly and had a significant loss of genetic variation. Tail length did not differ between populations. Forty tadpoles from a population captive-bred for 1–2 or for 9–12 generations (different ancestry) were divided between two treatments: chemical cues from viperine snakes or a control. Tadpoles were measured each 15 days. DNA was analysed.

 

Release captive-bred Mallorcan midwife toads Amphibian Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study in captivity the UK (Kraaijeveld-Smit et al. 2006) found that predator defences were maintained in a captive-bred reintroduced population of Mallorcan midwife toads Alytes muletensis, but genetic diversity was reduced. There was no significant difference in morphological responses to predators in a population that had been captive-bred for 3–8 generations and released in a predator-free pond and the ancestral natural population. Tail length, lower tail fin shape and development did not differ. In terms of genetic diversity, although heterozygosity was similar between populations, the reintroduced population had lower allelic richness. Forty-eight tadpoles from the natural and reintroduced population (with the same ancestry) were captured. Treatments were: chemical cues from viperine snakes Natrix maura or green frogs Rana perezi or a control. Tadpoles were measured each 15 days. DNA was analysed.