Study

Northern leopard frog reintroduction: year 4 (2002). Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Fish and Wildlife Service, Alberta Species at Risk Report

  • Published source details Kendell K. (2003) Northern leopard frog reintroduction: year 4 (2002). Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Fish and Wildlife Service, Alberta Species at Risk Report.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Engage volunteers to collect amphibian data (citizen science)

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Head-start amphibians for release

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Engage volunteers to collect amphibian data (citizen science)

    A study in 2002 of a northern leopard frog Rana pipiens reintroduction programme in Alberta, Canada (Kendell 2003) found that over 100 volunteers became involved in the project. Volunteers included members of the general public and individuals from wildlife and commercial organizations. The project was also publicized on the radio, television and in three newspapers. Volunteers helped with frog surveys and the collection, marking and release of captive-reared frogs. Many of the volunteers, naturalist groups and school groups were given formal and informal presentations about the captive rearing programme and the natural history of Alberta’s reptiles and amphibians.

  2. Translocate frogs

    A replicated study in 1999–2002 in Alberta, Canada (Kendell 2003) found limited evidence of breeding by translocated head-started northern leopard frog Rana pipiens. Seven released frogs were recaptured, another three were heard calling and one egg mass was observed at the site surveyed. Three to six egg masses were collected from the wild each year and reared to metamorphs in two man-made outdoor ponds. Predators were excluded or removed where possible. Between 1999 and 2002, a total of 6,500 captive-reared frogs were tagged and released at three new sites. Surveys were undertaken at one release site in May–July 2002.

     

  3. Head-start amphibians for release

    A replicated study in 1999–2002 of northern leopard frogs Rana pipiens in Alberta, Canada (Kendell 2003) found limited evidence of breeding following captive-rearing and release of frogs. At one site, seven released frogs were recaptured, a further three were heard calling and one egg mass was observed. Survival to metamorphosis in captivity was 17–33% each year. Three to six egg masses were collected from the wild each year and reared to froglets in two man-made outdoor ponds. Predation was prevented where possible by exclusion or removal of predators. Between 1999 and 2002, a total of 6,500 captive-reared frogs were tagged and released at three new sites. Surveys were undertaken at one release site in May–July 2002.

     

Output references

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