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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Relocation of a garlic toad (Pelobates fuscus) population

Published source details

Jensen B.H. (1997) Relocation of a garlic toad (Pelobates fuscus) population. Memoranda Societatis pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, 73, 111-113


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove tree canopy to reduce pond shading Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1994–1997 of two restored ponds in Jutland, Denmark (Jensen 1997) found that translocated garlic toads Pelobates fuscus established breeding populations of in both ponds. Breeding was recorded in one in 1996 and the other in 1997. Ponds were restored by removing surrounding willows and by levelling the banks of one pond. Forty-three toads were captured from a pond being eliminated by development. Four egg strings were laid and raised in captivity. The 43 adults and 1,000 tadpoles were released into one of the restored ponds in 1994. Toads were monitored by tadpole and call surveys.

 

Translocate toads Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1994–1997 in Jutland, Denmark (Jensen 1997) found that translocated adult and head-started tadpole garlic toads Pelobates fuscus established breeding populations in two restored, but not two created ponds. The authors considered failure might have been due to predation because of the lack of vegetation and introduction of sticklebacks Pungitius pungitius. Forty-three toads were captured from a pond being eliminated by development. They were translocated to a restored pond. Four egg strings were laid in captivity and produced over 2,000 tadpoles. They were released at different stages before metamorphosis into the same restored and one created pond (n = 1,000). Two ponds had been restored and two created in 1994–1995. Toads were monitored by tadpole and call surveys.

 

Create ponds for toads Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1994–1997 of two created ponds in Jutland, Denmark (Jensen 1997) found that after three years, released captive-bred garlic toads Pelobates fuscus had not colonized, but common toads Bufo bufo and common frogs Rana temporaria had colonized naturally. Authors considered that garlic toads may not have colonized due to predation because of the lack of vegetation and introduction of sticklebacks Pungitius pungitius. Common toads and common frogs colonized different ponds. Ponds were created in 1994–1995. One thousand captive-bred garlic toad tadpoles were released at different stages before metamorphosis into one of the ponds in 1994. Monitoring was by tadpole and call surveys.

 

Deepen, de-silt or re-profile ponds Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1994–1997 of two restored ponds in Jutland, Denmark (Jensen 1997) found that translocated garlic toads Pelobates fuscus established breeding populations in both ponds. Breeding was recorded in one in 1996 and the other in 1997. Ponds were restored by removing surrounding willows and by levelling the banks of one pond. Forty-three toads were captured from a pond being eliminated by development. Four egg strings were produced and raised in captivity. The 43 adults and 1,000 tadpoles were released into one of the restored ponds in 1994. Toads were monitored by tadpole and call surveys.

 

(Summarised by Rebecca K Smith)

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1994–1997 of garlic toads Pelobates fuscus in Jutland, Denmark (Jensen 1997) found that released head-started tadpoles established breeding populations in the two restored, but not two created ponds. Forty-three adults were also translocated to one of the restored ponds. Authors considered that the failure of created ponds may have been due to predation, because of the lack of vegetation and introduction of sticklebacks Pungitius pungitius. Four egg strings were laid in captivity and produced over 2,000 tadpoles. One thousand tadpoles were released at different stages before metamorphosis into one restored and one created pond. Two ponds had been restored and two created in 1994–1995. Tadpole and call surveys were undertaken.