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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: An assessment of the relative success of different conservation strategies for the Jersey agile frog (Rana dalmatina)

Published source details

Jameson A. (2009) An assessment of the relative success of different conservation strategies for the Jersey agile frog (Rana dalmatina). MSc thesis. Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology. University of Kent.


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Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 2008 of Jersey agile frogs Rana dalmatina on Jersey, UK (Jameson 2009) found that survival to metamorphosis was higher for head-started animals than those in the wild (15–22 vs 9–17%). However, those with initial protection in the wild (17%) had similar survival to those head-started. There was no significant difference in survival from release to dispersal of head-started tadpoles released earlier (32–46%) or later (40–46%). However, those released later were larger (0.6–0.7 vs 0.5–0.6 g). Head-started metamorphs were larger than those in the wild (0.5–0.7 vs 0.3–0.5 g). Eleven egg masses were collected and raised in aquaria. Tadpoles (n = 4,468) were marked and released back to two ponds in two groups, 10 days apart. Egg masses left in the wild were either protected in mesh bags for two weeks, or for four weeks in bags followed by protection pens. In June–July, frogs were monitored daily using pitfall traps 3 m apart along drift-fences surrounding ponds.