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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Gopher frog head-starting project reaches major milestone

Published source details

Hill R. (2012) Gopher frog head-starting project reaches major milestone. Amphibian Ark Newsletter, 21, 9


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A study in 2010–2012 in southwest Georgia, USA (Hill 2012) found that a number of translocated head-started gopher frogs Lithobates capito survived. Some froglets released in 2012 were observed later in the year and a large adult female released in 2010 was captured. Portions of egg masses were collected from one of the remaining breeding sites and transferred to partner institutions for rearing to metamorphosis. Tadpoles were reared outdoors in large tanks with plant matter from the egg collection site. Over 4,300 froglets were marked and released onto restored Nature Conservancy land, which lacked a natural population. In 2012, froglets were released directly into burrows as protection from drought. Monitoring began in summer 2012.

 

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 2010–2012 of gopher frogs Lithobates capito in southwest Georgia, USA (Hill 2012) found that some head-started froglets survived once released. In 2012, some froglets released earlier that year were observed and a large adult female that had been released in 2010 was re-captured. Portions of egg masses were collected from one of the remaining breeding sites and transferred to institutions for rearing to metamorphosis. Tadpoles were reared outdoors in large tanks with plant matter from the egg collection site. Tadpoles were offered some supplemental feeding, but largely ate the plants provided. Over 4,300 froglets were marked and released onto restored Nature Conservancy land, which lacked a natural population. In 2012, froglets were released directly into burrows as protection from drought. Monitoring began in summer 2012.