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Individual study: Demise of translocated populations of mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) in Sierra Nevada of California

Published source details

Fellers G.M., Bradford D.F., Pratt D. & LongWood L. (2007) Demise of translocated populations of mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) in Sierra Nevada of California. Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 2, 5-21


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Translocate frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1994–1998 at four sites in meadow in Sequoia National Park, California, USA (Fellers et al. 2007) found that following translocation of mountain yellow-legged frogs Rana muscosa there was no evidence of reproduction at three sites and insufficient reproduction to maintain a population at the fourth. Survival of all life history stages was high in the first week and metamorphs and adults were present at end of the first summer. However, nearly all life history stages disappeared within 12 months of translocation. At one site there was recruitment of 28 adults from tadpoles. However, in 1997 all frogs at that site were sick or dead, thought due to chytridiomycosis and/or pesticides. A total of 22 of 135 frogs were found in nearby ponds. In 1994 and 1995, egg masses (2/site), tadpoles (0–108), sub-adults (0–25) and adults (0–31) were released at four previously occupied sites, 30 km from the original population. Release sites were monitored every 1–3 days in summer in 1994–1995, monthly in 1996–1997 and once in 1998. Visual surveys and adult captures were undertaken.