Study

Romer’s frog reintroduction into a degraded tropical landscape, Hong Kong, P.R. China

  • Published source details Dudgeon D. & Lau M.W.N. (1999) Romer’s frog reintroduction into a degraded tropical landscape, Hong Kong, P.R. China. Re-introduction News, 17, 10-11

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Captive breeding frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred frogs

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1992–1998 in Hong Kong (Dudgeon & Lau 1999) found that released captive-bred Romer’s frog Philautus romeri tadpoles and adults established and maintained populations at seven of eight sites for four to five years after release. However, populations remained small and only one expanded its range significantly. In 1992, a total of 230 adults, several eggs and tadpoles were collected from the wild. Thirty adults were sent to Melbourne Zoo and the remainder were housed at the University of Hong Kong. A total of 1,170 frogs and 1,622 tadpoles were released in 1993 at three sites and in 1994 at eight sites. Additional small ponds were constructed at some sites to provide fish-free habitat. Frogs were monitored annually by call and visual surveys.

     

  2. Captive breeding frogs

    A replicated study in 1992–1998 in Hong Kong and Australia (Dudgeon & Lau 1999) found that Romer’s frogs Philautus romeri reproduced in captivity. Over 180 egg clutches were produced in captivity in Hong Kong and at least 706 captive-bred frogs were produced from the captive population in Australia. A total of 1,170 frogs and 1,622 tadpoles were released in 1993–1994. In 1992, several eggs and tadpoles and 230 adults were collected from the wild. Thirty adults were sent to Melbourne Zoo and the remainder were housed at the University of Hong Kong.

     

Output references

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