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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Relocation, repatriation, and translocation of amphibians and reptiles: are they conservation strategies that work?

Published source details

Dodd C.K.Jr. & Seigel R.A. (1991) Relocation, repatriation, and translocation of amphibians and reptiles: are they conservation strategies that work? Herpetologica, 47, 336-350


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Translocate amphibians Amphibian Conservation

A review of translocation programmes for amphibians (Dodd & Seigel 1991) found that none of the six programmes identified were considered successful as they did not provide evidence that a stable breeding population had been established. Two of the programmes did result in breeding, in the eastern spadefoot Pelobates syriacus (larvae and juveniles translocated) and the banded newt Triturus vittatus (juveniles translocated). Translocation of the natterjack toad Bufo calamita in England was not considered successful. The release of half a million wild-caught and captive-bred Houston toads Bufo houstonensis (adults, juveniles, metamorphs, tadpoles) to 10 sites did not result in establishment of any populations. Success was unknown for the Coeur d'Alene salamander Plethodon idahoensis and Puerto Rican crested toad Peltophryne lemur (juveniles and adults translocated). Published and unpublished literature was searched.