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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Anurans as biological indicators of restoration success in the greater Everglades ecosystem

Published source details

Dixon A.D. (2011) Anurans as biological indicators of restoration success in the greater Everglades ecosystem. Southeastern Naturalist, 10, 629-646


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Restore wetland Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, controlled, site comparison study in 2008 of 18 sites within a large wetland restoration area in Florida, USA (Dixon 2011) found that restored sites had higher amphibian species richness and abundance than non-restored sites. Species richness was significantly higher in restored compared to non-restored (8 vs 5–6) wetlands and similar to natural (7–8) wetlands. Abundance was significantly higher in restored compared to non-restored wetlands one year (27 vs 10) but not four years after restoration (18 vs 17). Abundance was highest in natural wetlands (28–35). Species assemblages differed between wetland types. Overall, five species of tadpole were found in restored wetlands (mainly 1/wetland) compared to none in non-restored sites. Natural wetlands contained six species (mainly 1/wetland). Restoration within a failed residential development site involved plugging canal systems to restore previous water levels. Permanent ponds and ephemeral wetlands were created. There were two areas, restored either one or four years previously, each with three replicates of three wetland types: restored, non-restored and natural. Amphibians were monitored during six call surveys in May–September and monthly dip-netting in June–August 2008.