Study

How to lose a habitat in 5 years: trial and error in the conservation of the farmland green tree frog Rhacophorus arvalis in Taiwan

  • Published source details Chang J.C.-W., Tang H.-C., Chen S.-L. & Chen P.-C. (2008) How to lose a habitat in 5 years: trial and error in the conservation of the farmland green tree frog Rhacophorus arvalis in Taiwan. International Zoo Yearbook, 42, 109-115

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide education programmes about amphibians

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Pay farmers to cover the costs of conservation measures

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Provide education programmes about amphibians

    A study in 2001–2008 of an educational programme for children in Taiwan (Chang et al. 2008) found that 700 school children attended ‘Froggy Camps’. In 2001–2002, summer camps were two days and one night and from 2003 three days and two nights. Since 2005, camps were held twice a year. Children were given lessons on amphibians and insects in Taiwan and were taken into the field to observe frogs and other wildlife. They were taught to identify all 32 species of frogs and about how to protect natural resources.

     

  2. Pay farmers to cover the costs of conservation measures

    A before-and-after study in 2001–2006 of subsidising farmers to maintain bamboo bushes in Taiwan (Chang et al. 2008) found that following five years of subsidies, the area of green tree frog Rhacophorus arvalis habitat had decreased by approximately 50%. This was considered by the authors to be the result of aging farmers changing from growing bamboo to crops that were less physically demanding and the low price of bamboo. Before agreement finalization in 2006, farmers asked for double the subsidies otherwise they would change their crops. Some did change crops. Taipei Zoo, Taipei Zoological Foundation, the Wild Bird Society of Yunlin and the Farmers’ Association of Gukeng Township raised funds for the conservation project. A five-year agreement was drawn up with 21 farmers to maintain a 5 ha area of bamboo bush that they owned. Farmers were given approximately US $150 each year provided that original farming patterns were maintained, pesticide use was avoided, fallen leaves were left on the ground and bamboo bushes were watered.

     

  3. Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

    A study in 2001–2008 of raising awareness about amphibian conservation in Taiwan (Chang et al. 2008) found that holding press conferences to publicize frog conservation did not appear to help a green tree frog Rhacophorus arvalis project. Authors felt that the public was only interested in ‘good news’ stories about animals and that the media only focused on political issues. Press conferences were held and news released about the progress of the conservation project to stimulate concern and interest amongst local people. Radio, television, the Internet, web sites, e-mails, blogs and magazines were used to increase awareness. Documentaries and special programmes for educating the general public were also broadcast.

     

     

Output references

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