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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Captive management of the endangered Wyoming toad at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Published source details

Burton M.S., Thorne E.T., Anderson A. & Kwiatkowski D.R. (1995) Captive management of the endangered Wyoming toad at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. Bulletin of the Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians, 5, 6-8


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use hormone treatment to induce sperm and egg release during captive breeding Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1991–1994 of Wyoming toads Bufo hemiophrys baxteri in a zoo in Colorado, USA (Burton et al. 1995) found that five of seven hormonally induced females produced thousands of fertile eggs in 1994. However, the majority of tadpoles that hatched died within 72 hours. Deaths were considered by the authors to have been due to water quality. In captivity, two to four wild-caught and captive-bred toads were housed per tank (40 x 61 x 23 cm) at 20°C. Cork bark, sheet moss, sand, water, artificial plants and a basking lamp were provided. In 1991–1993, toads were transported to breeding enclosures at the edge of the lake. In 1994, five toads were overwintered for six weeks at 4.5°C. Seven females were hormonally induced and paired in captivity.

 

Captive breeding toads Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1991–1994 of Wyoming toads Bufo hemiophrys baxteri in a zoo in Colorado, USA (Burton et al. 1995) found that breeding was moderately successful in field enclosures but in captivity although females produced eggs, tadpoles did not survive. Protected breeding pens in the field were considered by the authors to be moderately successful. In captivity, five of seven hormonally induced females produced thousands of fertile eggs in 1994. However, the majority of tadpoles that hatched died within 72 hours. Deaths were considered by the authors to have been due to water quality. In captivity, two to four wild-caught and captive-bred toads were housed per tank (40 x 61 x 23 cm) at 20°C. Cork bark, sheet moss, sand, water, artificial plants and a basking lamp were provided. In 1991–1993, toads were transported to breeding enclosures at the edge of the lake. In 1994, five toads were overwintered for six weeks at 4.5°C. Seven females were hormonally induced and paired in captivity.