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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Recovery of Bombina bombina in Funen County, Denmark

Published source details

Briggs L. (1997) Recovery of Bombina bombina in Funen County, Denmark. Memoranda Societatis pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, 73, 101-104


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create ponds for toads Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1986–1997 of 69 created and restored ponds at six sites in Funen County, Denmark (Briggs 1997) found that creating and restoring ponds, along with head-starting, increased the population of European fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina. Numbers increased from 82 in 1986–1988 to 542 in 1995–1997 (from 1–30 to 8–170/site). Numbers of ponds occupied by adults increased from eight to 62 and by tadpoles from one to 18 over the same period. The population declined at only one site that was flooded with salt water. Ponds were restored by dredging or created. Wild-caught toads were paired in separate nest cages in ponds and eggs collected and reared in aquaria. Metamorphs and one-year-olds were released into ponds. Ponds were monitored for calling males and breeding success (capture-recapture estimate) annually in 1987–1997.

 

Deepen, de-silt or re-profile ponds Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1986–1997 of 69 restored and created ponds at six sites in Funen County, Denmark (Briggs 1997) found that there was an increase in the population of European fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina. The total adult population increased from 82 in 1986–1988 to 542 in 1995–1997 (from 1–30 to 8–170/site). Numbers of ponds occupied by adults increased from eight to 62 and by tadpoles from one to 18 over the same period. The population declined at only one site that was flooded with salt water. Ponds were restored by dredging or created. Wild-caught toads were paired in separate nest cages in ponds and eggs collected and reared in aquaria. Metamorphs and one-year-olds were released into ponds. Ponds were monitored for calling males and breeding success (capture-recapture estimate) annually in 1987–1997.

 

(Summarised by Rebecca K Smith)

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1986–1997 of restored and created ponds at six sites in Funen County, Denmark (Briggs 1997) found that releasing head-started toadlets increased the population of European fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina over 10 years. The total adult population increased from 82 in 1986–1988 to 542 in 1995–1997 (from 1–30 to 8–170 toads/site). Numbers of ponds occupied by adults increased from eight to 62 and by tadpoles from one to 18. The population only declined at one site that was flooded with salt water. Wild-caught toads were paired in separate nest cages in ponds and eggs collected and reared in aquaria. Metamorphs and one-year-olds were released into 69 restored and created ponds. Each year, ponds were monitored for calling males and breeding success (capture-recapture estimate) in 1987–1997.