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Individual study: Case study: a programme of habitat creation and great crested newt introduction to restored opencast land for British Coal Opencast

Published source details

Bray R. (1994) Case study: a programme of habitat creation and great crested newt introduction to restored opencast land for British Coal Opencast. Conservation and Management of Great Crested Newts, English Nature, Peterborough, 113-125.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create ponds for great crested newts Amphibian Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1991–1993 of eight created ponds on restored opencast mining land in England, UK (Bray 1994) found that head-started great crested newts Triturus cristatus returned as adults to five ponds and reproduced in three in the second year. Adults returned to at least five of eight ponds and tadpoles were caught in three of five ponds netted in 1993 (2–5 tadpoles/pond). Sixteen ponds (30 x 20 m) with shelved edges and terrestrial habitat were created on restored opencast land. Ponds were planted with submerged and edge plants. Terrestrial habitat created included scrub, woodland, rough grassland, ditches and hedgerows. Newt eggs were collected and reared to larvae in aquaria. In 1991, 630 larvae were released into four ponds and in 1992, 1,366 larvae into eight ponds (66–243/pond). Ponds were surveyed using dip-netting in July 1993.

 

Head-start amphibians for release Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1991–1993 of created ponds on restored opencast mining land in England, UK (Bray 1994) found that released head-started great crested newt Triturus cristatus tadpoles returned as adults and bred in the second year. Adults returned to at least five of eight ponds and larvae were caught in three of five ponds netted in 1993 (2–5 tadpoles/pond). Newt eggs were collected and reared to tadpoles in aquaria. In 1991, 630 tadpoles were released into four ponds and in 1992, 1,366 tadpoles into eight ponds (66–243/pond). Ponds were surveyed using a dip-net in July 1993. Sixteen ponds (30 x 20 m) with shelved edges and terrestrial habitat had been created on restored land. Ponds were planted with submerged and edge plants. Terrestrial habitat created included scrub/woodland, rough grassland, ditches and hedgerows.