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Individual study: A zoospore inhibition technique to evaluate the activity of antifungal compounds against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and unsuccessful treatment of experimentally infected green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by fluconazole and benzalkonium chloride

Published source details

Berger L., Speare R., Marantelli G. & Skerratt L.F. (2009) A zoospore inhibition technique to evaluate the activity of antifungal compounds against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and unsuccessful treatment of experimentally infected green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by fluconazole and benzalkonium chloride. Research in Veterinary Science, 87, 106–110


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Use antifungal treatment to reduce chytridiomycosis infection Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, controlled study of captive amphibians in Melbourne, Australia (Berger et al. 2009) found that although treatment with benzalkonium chloride or fluconazole resulted in increased survival times for juvenile green tree frogs Litoria caerulea, mortality rate was still 100%. All treated and untreated frogs died and all uninfected frogs survived. Treatments significantly increased survival time (benzalkonium chloride: 43–44 days, range 21–67; fluconazole: 44 days, range 29–76) compared to untreated frogs (38 days, range 30–67). Time until death did not differ significantly between treatments. Eighteen experimentally infected frogs were sprayed twice a day and kept in a solution with benzalkonium chloride at 1 mg/L and 18 with fluconazole at 25 mg/L. Half were treated for three days and half for seven days. Fourteen were untreated.