Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Improvement of breeding success of the moor frog (Rana arvalis) by liming of acid moorland pools and the consequences of liming for water chemistry and diatoms

Published source details

Bellemakers M.J.S. & van Dam H. (1992) Improvement of breeding success of the moor frog (Rana arvalis) by liming of acid moorland pools and the consequences of liming for water chemistry and diatoms. Environmental Pollution, 78, 165-171


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Add lime to water bodies to reduce acidification Amphibian Conservation

A replicated controlled before-and-after study in 1987–1989 of eight acidic moorland ponds in a Nature Reserve in central Netherlands (Bellemakers & van Dam 1992) found that adding limestone decreased fungal infection of moor frog Rana arvalis eggs. Fungal infection rate decreased from 75–100% pre-treatment and in unlimed ponds to 0–25% in limed ponds. No differences were found between temporary and permanent ponds. Removal of Sphagnum moss had no effect on infection rate. Ponds were 1–3 m2 in size and 13–43 cm deep. In March 1988, powdered limestone was added to four ponds (15–48 kg; grain <3 mm). Sphagnum moss and most organic sediment had previously been removed from two of the ponds. An additional two ponds were controls and two just had Sphagnum removed. Each treatment had a permanent and temporary (re-limed annually) pond. Fungal infection of eggs was estimated for entire ponds every two weeks in March–May.