Study

Lessons learned from a series of translocations of the archaic Hamilton’s frog and Maud Island frog in central New Zealand

  • Published source details Bell B.D., Bishop P.J. & Germano J.M. (2010) Lessons learned from a series of translocations of the archaic Hamilton’s frog and Maud Island frog in central New Zealand. Pages 81-87 in: Global Re-introduction Perspectives: 2010. Additional case studies from around the globe. IUCN/SSC Re-introduction Specialist Group, Gland, Switzerland.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Remove or control mammals

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Remove or control mammals

    A controlled study in 2006–2009 of translocated Maud Island frogs Leiopelma pakeka in Zealandia, New Zealand (Bell, Bishop & Germano 2010) found that survival was significantly higher in a predator-proof enclosure than in the wild. Survival in the enclosure was 93%. In the wild, numbers observed declined significantly, where house mice Mus musculus and little spotted kiwis Apteryx owenii were known predators. In the enclosure, two males bred successfully in 2008. Sixty frogs were translocated from Maud Island and placed in a 2 x 4 m predator-proof mesh enclosure in 2006. In April 2007, 29 were retained in the enclosure and 28 released into the adjacent forest.

     

  2. Translocate frogs

    A study in 2006–2009 in Zealandia, Wellington, New Zealand (Bell, Bishop & Germano 2010) found that survival of Maud Island frogs Leiopelma pakeka released in a predator-proof enclosure was high (93%), but in the wild was low. Numbers observed in the wild declined significantly, where house mice Mus musculus and little spotted kiwis Apteryx owenii were known predators. In the enclosure, two males were recorded breeding in February 2008 and 10 nearly metamorphosed young frogs resulted. Sixty frogs from Maud Island were placed in a 2 x 4 m predator-proof mesh enclosure in 2006. In April 2007, 29 were retained in the enclosure and 28 were released into the adjacent forest. Larvae found were moved to incubators to complete metamorphosis and then released into nursery pens.

     

Output references
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