Study

The population ecology of the common spadefoot toad (Pelobates fuscus) near Leiferde (district Gifhorn, Germany) with special regard to the effect of its artificial relocation into a new breeding-pond

  • Published source details Baumann K. (1997) The population ecology of the common spadefoot toad (Pelobates fuscus) near Leiferde (district Gifhorn, Germany) with special regard to the effect of its artificial relocation into a new breeding-pond. Braunschweiger Naturkundliche Schriften, 5, 249-267.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Create ponds for toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Translocate toads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Create ponds for toads

    A before-and-after study in 1986–1994 of a created forest pond in Gifhorn, Germany (Baumann 1997) found that translocated common spadefoot toads Pelobates fuscus established a breeding population in the pond. Monitoring indicated that 33% of translocated toads and 31% of naturally colonizing toads reproduced in the created pond. A total of 152 juveniles were recorded in the pond in 1990. Mortality rate of translocated toads was high, with only 19% of toads recaptured in 1993–1994. A pond (700 m²) was created for amphibians in 1988. From 1989, toads were captured using drift-fencing with pitfall traps along the opposite side of the road. Toads were marked and translocated across the road to the pond. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps either side of the road and around the pond.

     

  2. Translocate toads

    A before-and-after study in 1986–1994 of a created pond in Gifhorn, Germany (Baumann 1997) found that translocated common spadefoot toads Pelobates fuscus bred in the new pond. Mortality rate of translocated toads was high, with only 19% of toads recaptured in 1993–1994. Monitoring indicated that 33% of translocated toads reproduced in the created pond. A total of 152 juveniles were recorded in the pond in 1990. From 1989, toads were captured using drift-fencing with pitfall traps along the side of the road. Toads were marked and translocated across the road to the pond (700 m²) created for amphibians within forest in 1988. Monitoring was undertaken using drift-fencing with pitfall traps either side of the road and around the pond.

     

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust