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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Evaluation of anuran richness in restored wetlands of central Louisiana

Published source details

Barlow S.J. (2007) Evaluation of anuran richness in restored wetlands of central Louisiana. MSc thesis. Louisiana State University and Agriculture and Mechanical College.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create wetland Amphibian Conservation

A site comparison study in 2004–2005 of eight created and 14 restored wetlands associated with hardwood forests in Louisiana, USA (Barlow 2007) found no significant difference in amphibian species richness between created/restored and natural wetlands. Twelve of 13 species in the area were found within the wetlands, one of which was only found in created/restored wetlands (upland chorus frog Pseudacris feriarum). Species richness was higher in 2004 (created/restored: 3.7; natural: 4.2) than 2005 (created/restored: 2.4; natural: 2.2). Richness was positively associated with water depth, canopy cover, flooding, aquatic vegetation and surrounding forest. Temporary and permanent wetlands were 1–174 ha and had been created or restored 1–18 years previously. Restoration had included replanting trees, water management and dredging. Eight natural wetlands within a wildlife refuge were used for comparison. Amphibians were monitored by call surveys (2/season), egg mass counts (1/season) and dip-netting (monthly along a 100 m transect).

 

Restore wetland Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2004–2005 of 14 restored and eight created wetlands associated with hardwood forests in Louisiana, USA (Barlow 2007) found no significant difference in amphibian species richness between restored/created and natural wetlands (2.9 vs 2.9). Twelve of 13 species in the area were found within the wetlands, one of which was only found in restored wetlands (upland chorus frog Pseudacris feriarum). Species richness was higher in 2004 (restored: 3.7; natural: 4.2) than 2005 (restored: 2.4; natural: 2.2). Species richness was positively associated with water depth, canopy cover, flooding, aquatic vegetation and surrounding forest. Temporary and permanent wetlands were 1–174 ha and had been restored 1–18 years previously. Restoration had included replanting trees, water management and dredging. Eight natural wetlands within a wildlife refuge were used for comparison. Amphibians were monitored by call surveys (two/season), egg mass counts (one/season) and dip-netting (monthly along 100 m transect).