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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Captive management and pathology of sharp-snouted torrent frogs, Taudactylus acutirostris, at Melbourne and Taronga Zoos

Published source details

Banks C.B. & McCracken H.E. (2002) Captive management and pathology of sharp-snouted torrent frogs, Taudactylus acutirostris, at Melbourne and Taronga Zoos. Pages 94-102 in: Frogs in the Community. Queensland Frog Society Inc., Brisbane.


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Captive breeding frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1993 of captive sharp snouted dayfrogs Taudactylus acutirostris at Melbourne and Taronga Zoos, Australia (Banks & McCracken 2002) found that only one of 109 animals taken in to captivity survived to 18 months. The one adult died within a month of the introduction of three adults from another zoo, which died at the same time. Of the others, 79 died as tadpoles, 11 during metamorphosis and 18 as metamorphs. Causes of death were largely unknown. In 1993, a total of 109 tadpoles were sent to the two zoos in five separate groups. Tadpoles at Taronga Zoo were housed at 20–23°C in three different-sized tanks with water at different depths (15–45 cm), gravel, stones, wood and pond weed. At Melbourne Zoo, tadpoles were housed at 17–24°C in groups of 8–10 in tanks (45 x 53 x 14 cm). Water was cleaned weekly. Animals were treated for dermatitis.