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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Breeding and management of the great barred frog, Mixophyes fasciolatus, at Melbourne Zoo

Published source details

Banks C., Birkett J., Young S., Vincent M. & Hawkes T. (2003) Breeding and management of the great barred frog, Mixophyes fasciolatus, at Melbourne Zoo. Herpetofauna, 33, 2-12


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amphibians: Manipulate temperature of enclosure to improve development or survival to adulthood Management of Captive Animals

A replicated study in 1998 of captive great barred frogs Mixophyes fasciolatus at Melbourne Zoo, Australia found that tadpoles took longer to reach metamorphosis when kept at lower temperatures. Lower temperatures resulted in later metamorphosis (16-20°C: 120–132 days; 18-22°C: 80 days; 19–22°C: 99–108 days), although no statistical tests were carried out. Delayed metamorphosis may be beneficial or detrimental to survival depending on the relative risk associated with different habitats. Five groups of 75 tadpoles were housed in five separate tanks, two groups kept at kept at 19-22°C, two groups kept at 16-20°C, and one group kept at 18-22°C.

Captive breeding frogs Amphibian Conservation

A replicated study in 1993–2000 of captive great barred frogs Mixophyes fasciolatus at Mebourne Zoo, Australia (Banks et al. 2003) found that frogs bred successfully in captivity. In 1998, males called and three clumps of 300–500 eggs were produced. Nine egg clumps were produced in 1999–2000, some by frogs hatched in 1998. In 1998–2000, over 200 young frogs were sent to other breeders. Breeding also occurred outdoors. Tadpole growth was similar at 16–20°C and 18–22°C, but lower temperatures resulted in later metamorphosis (120–132 vs 99–108 days). A number of frogs had a metabolic bone disease that was successfully treated. In 1993–1995, 12 metamorphs were received and raised to adults. Two breeding groups of four were housed in glass aquaria (180 x 45 x 45 cm) with organic substrate, rocks, logs and water. Rain was simulated for two hours/day and night for six days in April. Tadpoles were housed in separate tanks (45 x 53 x 15 cm). In 2000, seven frogs were housed in an outdoor enclosure (300 x 300 x 220 cm).